Message from New Zealandニュージーランドからのメッセージ

仁愛女子高校

NZからのメッセージ(Moe)

2020/07/27

Hi everyone. I’m Moe. My classmates have posted essays about their lives in NZ. However, today, what I’d like to share with you is not about my life, but my opinion about a topic which has been actively covered in the media not only in New Zealand but also all over the world. Please read my essay below.

“Black Lives Matter.” Have you guys heard of this phrase? I often hear this phrase these days. In America, the people who oppose discrimination against black people have raised their voices. Their voices are becoming more urgent year by year.

On May 25, 2020, a policeman killed a black man, George Floyd, kneeling on him for 8 minutes and 46 seconds on the street. He was handcuffed and lay prone on the ground. The scene was filmed by a 17-year-old girl who was a passerby. Mr. Floyd repeated, “I can’t breathe” over and over again. However, the policeman did not change his mind. Passersby attempted to stop the policeman, but he didn’t stop it. On arriving, a doctor put Mr. Floyd on a stretcher, but he was already dead.

What does the phrase “Black Lives Matter” mean? It is an anthem, a slogan, a hashtag and a straightforward statement of fact. This is not a new movement. The movement started in 2013 in the USA. In that country, many black people are killed and they are twice as likely to be killed by police officers as white people. According to a 2015 study, African Americans died at the hands of the police at a rate of 7.2 people per population of one million.

Do you know the phrase “All Lives Matter?” It is used by many people on Twitter and Instagram in the same way as “Black Lives Matter.” However, “All Lives Matter” is problematic. At first, “All Lives Matter” sounds like we are all in this together. Some people are using this phrase to suggest that we should join and stand together against racism. But the problem is that the phrase takes focus away from black people. The people who use “All Lives Matter” have to understand that “Black Lives Matter” doesn’t mean that nobody else matters.

Abusing black people just because they are black, or throwing the N-word, which is a discriminatory word against black people, is obviously racism. Black people are still suffering from these direct acts of discrimination. However, at the same time, they are struggling with a different kind of discrimination, “institutional racism.” It means that a black person is born as a black person and the subsequent life automatically becomes unfavorable because of people’s subconscious stereotypes. This problem seems not to be direct discrimination, and it’s very difficult to eliminate.

Slavery continued for over 250 years in America. It is finished, but discrimination hasn’t gone away. Many black people are being killed every year by police and civilians who have guns. Here’s a similar story to Mr. Floyd’s. A black high school student went to a convenience store to buy juice. However, on the way back, he was shot dead as “suspicious”. Ordinary daily life is regarded as “suspicious” and “dangerous” because of stereotypes and institutional racism and black people are easily killed.

Nelson Mandela says, “No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background, or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite. “

I think the first step to combating racism is listening to each other, no matter who you are and no matter who you are talking to. You should listen and try to understand other people’s points of view. You need to see things from different perspectives. By doing so, you’ll find something new. We must not discriminate against black people because we were born in the same world and we are living in the same age. If you hold prejudice, please take an interest in this topic. There is nothing more important than creating an equal world in which black people don’t have to be afraid to walk along the road, or to go shopping.

Thank you for reading my essay.

Moe Yamazaki

みなさん、こんにちは。萌絵です。私のクラスメートはニュージーランドでの生活に関するエッセーを掲載してきました。しかし、今日、私が皆さんと共有したいのは、私の生活ではなく、今ニュージーランドだけでなく世界中でメディアが扱っている話題についての意見です。以下のエッセーを読んでください。

「黒人の命も大切だ。」皆さんは、この言葉を聞いたことがありますか。私は最近この言葉よく耳にします。アメリカでは、黒人差別に反対する人たちが声をあげています。彼らの声は年々高まってきています。

2020年5月25日、ある警察官が黒人のジョージ・フロイドさんを膝で8分46秒間押さえつけて殺しました。彼は手錠をかけられ地面にうつ伏せになっていました。この場面が通りかかった17歳の女の子に動画で撮影されました。フロイドさんは、「息ができない。」と何度も何度も繰り返したそうです。しかし、警察官は考えを変えることはありませんでした。通行人たちもその警察官をとめようとしましたが、その警察官はやめませんでした。医者が到着しすぐに担架に乗せましたが、すでに死亡していました。

この「黒人の命も大切だ」という言葉は何を意味しているのでしょうか。その言葉は、歌になっていて、スローガンでもあり、ハッシュタグもつけられ、事実を単刀直入に表現したものです。新しい動きではありません。2013年にアメリカで始まりました。この国では、たくさんの黒人が殺されていて、警察官に殺される割合は白人の2倍です。2015年の調査によると、100万人に7.2人のアフリカ系アメリカ人が警察官により命を奪われました。

「全ての命は大切だ」という言葉を知っていますか。この言葉も、「黒人の命も大切だ」という言葉と同じようにツイッターやインスタグラムで多くの人々に使われています。しかし、「全ての命は大切だ」という言葉は、問題を含んでいます。「全ての命は大切だ」という言葉は、全ての人が同等だというように聞こえます。この言葉を、皆が人種差別に立ち向かうべきだという意味で使う人もいます。問題は、この言葉だと、注目が黒人から離れてしまいます。「全ての命は大切だ」という使う人は、「黒人の命も大切だ」という言葉は、「他の人の命は大切ではない」という意味ではない、ということを理解しなければいけません。

黒人だからという理由だけで黒人に暴力的行為を行う、黒人への差別表現であるN-wordを使うというようなことは、明らかに人種差別です。黒人たちは、このような直接的な差別行為をうけています。しかし、同時に、また違った形の差別、「制度的人種差別」に苦しんでいます。これは、黒人が黒人として生まれたために、以後の人生が自然とに不利になってしまうというものです。この問題は、直接的な差別のようには見えませんが、排除するのは難しいです。

奴隷制度は250年以上続きました。奴隷制度は終わりましたが、差別はまだなくなっていません。多くの黒人たちの命が、警察官や拳銃をもった市民によって毎年奪われています。フロイドさんの事件と同じような事件がありました。ある黒人の高校生がジュースを買いにコンビニに行きました。その帰り道、不審者と見なされて射殺されました。固定観念や制度的人種差別のために、普通の日々の生活を行っているだけで「不審だ」「危険だ」と思われ、簡単に黒人の命が奪われているのです。

ネルソン・マンデラは次のように言っています。「生まれながらにして肌の色や出身や宗教を理由に他人を憎むひとは誰もいない。憎しみは後から学ぶものであり、もしにくしみを学ぶことができるなら、愛することも教えられるはずだ。愛はその反対の感情よりも、人間の心にとって自然になじむものだから。」

人種差別をなくす第一歩は、自分たちが誰であろうと、そして相手が誰であろうと、お互いに意見を聞き合うことだと思います。相手のことをよく聞き、相手の考え方を理解する努力をすべきです。違った観点から物事をとらえる必要があります。そうすることで、新しいことに気づくでしょう。私たちは、黒人を差別してはいけません。私たちは、同じ世界に生まれ、同じ時代を生きているのです。皆さんが偏見をもっているのであれば、この話題に関心をもってください。黒人の皆さんが、怖がらずに道を歩いたり、買い物に行ったりできる平等な世界を作ることが一番大切なことです。

読んでくださり、ありがとうございます。

山崎萌絵